Mobilize

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This phase involves reviewing the draft plan and getting ready to mobilize for climate action. We want to hear what community members think about the draft plan so we can refine the plan further. Additionally, we want to hear how residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and community organizations can help activate the plan and accelerate climate action in Kansas City and beyond.

The Draft Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan public comment period has ended. Thank you for your patience while we review the over 500 comments received!

You can still view the draft plan here

(Note that the online plan is interactive. For the best experience we recommend reviewing the online version.)

Plan appendices and supplemental documentation can be accessed through the "Important Links" section to the right.


Next Steps For Plan Adoption

1) The Office of Environmental Quality, the Climate Protection Steering Committee, and our consultant team will work on reviewing the draft comments received and use them to refine the plan document.

2) The final plan will go to the city Executive Team and City Council for review.

3) The plan will go before a City Council Committee (date and committee to be determined) for discussion. At this point the public can also comment on the plan in front of council. The committee will either recommend edits to the plan or forward to full City Council for adoption. Show your support!

4) City Council will vote on adopting the plan.

5) Once the plan is adopted, we mobilize for climate action!

This phase involves reviewing the draft plan and getting ready to mobilize for climate action. We want to hear what community members think about the draft plan so we can refine the plan further. Additionally, we want to hear how residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and community organizations can help activate the plan and accelerate climate action in Kansas City and beyond.

The Draft Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan public comment period has ended. Thank you for your patience while we review the over 500 comments received!

You can still view the draft plan here

(Note that the online plan is interactive. For the best experience we recommend reviewing the online version.)

Plan appendices and supplemental documentation can be accessed through the "Important Links" section to the right.


Next Steps For Plan Adoption

1) The Office of Environmental Quality, the Climate Protection Steering Committee, and our consultant team will work on reviewing the draft comments received and use them to refine the plan document.

2) The final plan will go to the city Executive Team and City Council for review.

3) The plan will go before a City Council Committee (date and committee to be determined) for discussion. At this point the public can also comment on the plan in front of council. The committee will either recommend edits to the plan or forward to full City Council for adoption. Show your support!

4) City Council will vote on adopting the plan.

5) Once the plan is adopted, we mobilize for climate action!

Plan Comments

Use this tool if you have a few comments you are okay with sharing publicly

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

p51 - I really appreciate the proposal to ban city usage of pesticides and snow treatments that impact the city's natural biodiversity.

p61 - yes, financing for energy efficient improvements in homes, that's great. repairs to reduce leaks from natural gas distribution system... nice, but let's also prioritize moving *away* from natural gas entirely towards sustainable options.

p62 - passive home construction and communal living spaces - sounds good!

p62 - financing options for homeowners & businesses to electrify buildings with efficient appliances - YES!

p67 - I support transitioning under-utilized urban spaces into gardens etc - especially in neighborhoods that already have lower amounts of green space.

p68 - yes! Farm-to-table programs for schools, incentives for groceries & restaurants to focus on food deserts & locally grown foods

p81 - equitable green jobs training, yes!

NRG about 2 months ago

Hello, my name is Rachel and I am a Kansas City, Missouri resident. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from Sunrise Movement KC's People’s Climate Town Hall. Specifically, I support the closure of the Hawthorn coal plant. It is incredibly important to me and my future that we switch to better energetic sources to have a cleaner environment to raise the next generation. You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

Rachelisabelly about 2 months ago

Hello, my name is Janessa Riehle and I am a Kansas City, Missouri resident of the 6th district. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from Sunrise Movement KC's People’s Climate Town Hall. I'm specifically concerned about access to safe and healthy homes in ALL districts and neighborhoods, as well as job security and reliable and free public transportation.

You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands".

Sincerely,
Janessa Riehle

Janessa Riehle about 2 months ago

While this plan is interesting, it doesn't factor in where energy will come from, just a pie-in-the-sky outlook from uninformed people. This plan looks like a really good way to have wide spread power outages for this region. These outages will come when demand on the system is at its peak, the hot days of summer and the coldest times in the winter. People will be injured, and these people will be the ones who need our help the most, the sick and the elderly. Also in this plan I don't see the part where the costs are paid for. Energy bills will go up dramatically, this will affect lower income families the hardest. I think that the group leading this effort better do a lot more research based on the technologies that are available now, and what impact that will have on our city.

KC resident about 2 months ago

p45 - I appreciate the focus on solar / renewable energy options for renters!

NRG about 2 months ago

p44 - carbon neutral by 2045?! "Carbon Neutral - or Net Zero Carbon - is a term used to describe the state of an entity (such as a company, service, product or event), where the carbon emissions caused by them have been balanced out by funding an equivalent amount of carbon savings elsewhere in the world." source: https://www.carbonfootprint.com/carbonneutrality.html#:~:text=Carbon%20Neutral%20%2D%20or%20Net%20Zero,savings%20elsewhere%20in%20the%20world.

We need much better than carbon neutral, and we need it MUCH sooner than 2045. ZERO carbon - not net-zero.

NRG about 2 months ago

So Evergy will be the ultimate provider of energy for Kansas City?? Talk about having a Monopoly, with no other options for competition? I see rolling black outs, and much much higher prices. Folks can't afford to just simply convert their appliances to all electric. KC better be ready for billions of extra dollars in assistance to help people convert in this endeavor.

Andrew about 2 months ago

p43 - Solar at the airport! Love it! I also encourage all efforts to increase solar usage throughout town on homes and *especially* on businesses.

NRG about 2 months ago

Pg 39, I strongly agree with encouraging low- and no-emission vehicles. But these ideas here aren't measurable commitments. Increasing access to EV chargers, and providing incentive programs, are great ideas, but I'd like to see more information and more specific goals.

NRG about 2 months ago

Kansas City needs a balance energy policy that includes natural gas to continue to have resilient, reliable and affordable energy now and in the future. I would not want electric stoves to be the way I cook in the future I want to option to use natural gas.

ELinstrom about 2 months ago

I’m a KCMO business owner and consultant located in 64110 zip code. I’ve helped small business owners grow their businesses including restaurants and other businesses that use natural gas. Why is this plan creating more price increases during a pandemic and at a time when we are seeing record level inflation? It’s difficult for small businesses to grow and this plan makes it even more difficult

AI Consultant about 2 months ago

I am a Kansas City resident concerned about the future of all in our city.

Climate experts across the world have repeatedly stressed the need is now for taking immediate and robust steps before it is too late to confront the challenges of climate change.

It is encouraging to see that the City is working to adopt a Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan. Kansas City was right to adopt strong goals in Resolution 200005, including the commitment to eliminating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity use citywide by 2030. It is good to see that the Plan demonstrates a focus on equity and inclusion; low-income communities and communities of color disproportionately bear the brunt of the impacts of climate change. The creation and implementation of rigorous plan is the only direction that can be taken after the City’s formal declaration of a climate and ecological emergency.

To meet our goals, I call on the Kansas City to adopt and implement a climate action plan that is commensurate to the monumental threat to our children’s future. The plan must minimally include the following objectives:

Energy Supply
• Eliminate greenhouse gas emissions citywide from electricity production and use by 2030.
• Secure enough renewable energy to help enable Kansas City to be powered citywide by 100% renewable electricity from wind and solar by 2035.

Transportation and Land Use
• Ensure that commercial and industrial private development projects, whether incentivized by the City or not, are designed and implemented to ensure results that are neutral or negative carbon emissions and that maximize community benefits.
• Establish a plan to ensure all new housing in Kansas City is located close to activity centers and corridors.
• Set mode share targets to increase the number of trips made by using public transit, biking, walking, carpooling, or avoided altogether by working from home.

Food and Product Consumption
• Ensure all Kansas Citians can access a food system that is community-driven, addresses food insecurity, prioritizes regenerative agriculture, supports dietary and health agency, promotes plant-based foods, and minimizes food waste.

Natural Systems
• Achieve at least 50% citywide tree canopy cover by planting native trees, focusing on increasing canopy cover over areas susceptible to heat island effects,
• Identify land within the city that can be used as additional carbon sinks, including urban forest, community gardens, native pollinator and rain gardens, and additional greenspace, focusing on building resilience, reducing heat island, and maximizing benefits in disproportionately-burdened areas.

Implementation and Monitoring
• Ensure that the Plan is updated regularly and that communities are engaged in every step of the process for development, implementation, and periodic evaluation of the Plan.
• Incorporate the goals of this plan across all city policy and departments
• Incorporate the goals of this plan into the Comprehensive Plan.
• Designate an implementation coordinator in city government for the plan working with departments and offices across city government.
• Commit to publishing Plan implementation progress reports annually, a GHG inventory at least every 3 years, and a plan update at least every 5 years.
• Create working groups or citizen advisory boards, where all positions have been appointed, working with the Climate Protection Plan Steering Committee to ensure direct participation and engagement of plan implementation by the public.

Equity
• Commit to establishing policies that ensure households of all income levels can benefit from more resilient, healthy, quality, and zero-carbon housing while preventing the displacement of communities and residents.
• Prioritize low-income communities of color to be the first to benefit from CPRP strategies, such as sustainable transportation infrastructure, increase renewable energy, and affordable infill housing.

Thank you for your time and the opportunity to weigh in on this important issue and for your continued commitment to serving all Kansas Citians.

Respectfully Submitted,

Don Wallace
Member, Legislative Committee,
Thomas Hart Benton Group
Missouri Chapter Sierra Club

Wallace about 2 months ago

Comments re Draft – Climate Protection Plan

I like much of this plan and its creative suggestions, such as repair cafes and lending libraries -- perhaps through local public libraries, green restaurant recognition and incentives, and food hubs. I like the way it values – and plans to increase local tree canopy and native plantings.

I like the suggestions about working with Evergy to increase renewable energy, including working with the Missouri State Legislature to make sure that this happens.

I like efforts to increase urban agriculture – including plantings in what now are lawns, and working to get a food distribution system that works for all areas of the city, including current food deserts. I like eliminating pesticides from public grounds – a measure that supports pollinators and also supports human health.

One thing I would like to see added is: more commitment of the city to model what it is asking of residents. In N-1.3, the plan asks community members to replace hardscapes with pervious surfaces. Why is this not also part of the section on city sidewalk renewal and ADA compliance? The city has much more power in its own purchasing and surely owns more hardscapes than anyone else! It may be too much to ask for streets and existing sidewalks to be replaced with pervious surfaces in the short term, but surely all *new* sidewalks could be required to be pervious surfaces.

In similar fashion: the city could not only model soil regeneration and elimination of pesticides on public grounds, but could support urban agriculture by creating demonstration gardens in some of the larger parks – and using these for educational purposes and to provide food to local food pantries.

It’s time for the city to walk its talk, not just to ask the rest of us to pitch in!

This plan is a good start. Please make it even stronger and move us to a more ecologically sound city that is carbon neutral as soon as possible.

KCgardener about 2 months ago

Hi, I'm a constituent of kansas city and I don't think the current plan outlined is enough to fight against the rapidity of climate change and how it will affect our city. Please see the following demands from the Sunrise Movement that I support.
https://docs.google.com/document/u/0/d/1snOfywhlDoX5ZpmxG_YAFHmigbFmpu0dlw0sNbo_veA/mobilebasic

Abbey symmonds about 2 months ago

Hi, I'm a constituent of kansas city and I don't think the current plan outlined is enough to fight against the rapidity of climate change and how it will affect our city. Please see the following demands from the Sunrise Movement that I support. https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

Briana about 2 months ago

These plans will kill business development in KC, MO as companies look for realistic building requirements in other areas or in Kansas. Business minded individuals should be at the table building this plan, not those who have never built a business/building and have no idea what the real impacts would be of plans not fully thought out.

Sarah Brown about 2 months ago

Hi, I'm a constituent of kansas city and I don't think the current plan outlined is enough to fight against the rapidity of climate change and how it will affect our city. Please see the following demands from the Sunrise Movement that I support. https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

Kc resident about 2 months ago

Well, the water reclamation plant needs to be replaced x 6. Emissions should be based on carbon footprint. The 1%has got to pay their share in taxes. Climate catastrophe is the most importance. I need to be able to take my current vehicle in. They take the current motor out and put in a new electric motor with equal or greater hp.
I need racial equality. No more cops shooting/putting us in cuffs because they are afraid. They need a different career. We need legislation to equal every environment to demographically proportioned. And/or there has to be non-whites at every level of government. At least 50%.
For the most of the 435 stretch, a train can be installed in the center division patch. Companies need profit caps to also cap greed. Skilled workers in the housing industry need union representation and Osha

J about 2 months ago

My name is Dan S and I'm a resident of the 4th District. There are a lot of good strategies in the Climate Action Plan, I just wanted to comment on a few of them in detail:
- I think the language about working with Evergy to increase renewable energy use is very passive. Evergy's plan to be net-zero directly hinders the goals of KCMO's climate plan. As one of Evergy's largest customers and representative of Evergy's largest city of customers, KCMO has more influence than the wording of the plan suggests. I suggest the city should push Evergy more to shift to renewables faster and retire fossil fuel generatation sooner, as shifting the grid impacts GHG emissions across nearly all the other areas, especially as EV adoption increases and building electrification occurs.
-I want to emphase the action E-2.4, which aims to reduce the cost of solar by evalutating the requirements by the city to get solar installed non-utility scale applications. In countries like Austialia, homeowners and business owners pay a fraction of the cost we do in the US, largely due to decrease soft costs like permitting. Reducing the cost for the average person will increase adoption, aid in grid resiliency, and make it easier to Evergy to move up its goals.
- Regarding microgrids and "virtual power plants", the plan mentions that this would have no impact on GHG emissions. Both of these tools would allow utilities to shift supply as needed, and with that would come the ability to optimize energy being supplied by renewable sources (or more specifically, from batteries that are primarily filled with energy produced by renewable sources). A difficult thing to measure, but definitely not an insignificant reduction in GHGs.
-For section E.4, there should be langauge about the "granularity" of the renewable energy credits (RECs) being purchased. Offsetting energy use for night time with credits that were generated from solar doesn't do much to push renewable energy technology further. It may be good to start with offseting energy use on a monthly basis, then weekly, then daily, and finally hourly. Doing so promotes investment in renewable energy that can be used in line with our energy use demands.

dsiroky about 2 months ago

Hello, my name is Rubi and I am from the Johnson District. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from the People’s Climate Town Hall. You can view the list of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

Rubi about 2 months ago
Page last updated: 13 Apr 2022, 12:47 PM