Mobilize

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This phase involves reviewing the draft plan and getting ready to mobilize for climate action. We want to hear what community members think about the draft plan so we can refine the plan further. Additionally, we want to hear how residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and community organizations can help activate the plan and accelerate climate action in Kansas City and beyond.

The Draft Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan public comment period has ended. Thank you for your patience while we review the over 500 comments received!

You can still view the draft plan here

(Note that the online plan is interactive. For the best experience we recommend reviewing the online version.)

Plan appendices and supplemental documentation can be accessed through the "Important Links" section to the right.


Next Steps For Plan Adoption

1) The Office of Environmental Quality, the Climate Protection Steering Committee, and our consultant team will work on reviewing the draft comments received and use them to refine the plan document.

2) The final plan will go to the city Executive Team and City Council for review.

3) The plan will go before a City Council Committee (date and committee to be determined) for discussion. At this point the public can also comment on the plan in front of council. The committee will either recommend edits to the plan or forward to full City Council for adoption. Show your support!

4) City Council will vote on adopting the plan.

5) Once the plan is adopted, we mobilize for climate action!

This phase involves reviewing the draft plan and getting ready to mobilize for climate action. We want to hear what community members think about the draft plan so we can refine the plan further. Additionally, we want to hear how residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and community organizations can help activate the plan and accelerate climate action in Kansas City and beyond.

The Draft Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan public comment period has ended. Thank you for your patience while we review the over 500 comments received!

You can still view the draft plan here

(Note that the online plan is interactive. For the best experience we recommend reviewing the online version.)

Plan appendices and supplemental documentation can be accessed through the "Important Links" section to the right.


Next Steps For Plan Adoption

1) The Office of Environmental Quality, the Climate Protection Steering Committee, and our consultant team will work on reviewing the draft comments received and use them to refine the plan document.

2) The final plan will go to the city Executive Team and City Council for review.

3) The plan will go before a City Council Committee (date and committee to be determined) for discussion. At this point the public can also comment on the plan in front of council. The committee will either recommend edits to the plan or forward to full City Council for adoption. Show your support!

4) City Council will vote on adopting the plan.

5) Once the plan is adopted, we mobilize for climate action!

Plan Comments

Use this tool if you have a few comments you are okay with sharing publicly

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

I am a resident of the 3rd district and am a young person. I support a Green New Deal as it is the only plan that creates enough radical, positive change to actually tackle the climate crisis and not leave people behind, which is why I am making comments on the CP&RP.

There are a lot of things being left out of the plan, like a focus on buses and bus workers as well as naming what "multicultural" means. I'm horrified by some of the comments in support of natural gas or even saying that the climate crisis is fake. Scientists have told us over and over again that to combat the crisis at hand we have to make drastic changes, and frontline communities have been reminding us the necessity of having them at the very center of that change. We have felt the climate crisis already here, as our urban heat index continues to go up and we start to experience more bizarre/unseasonal weather.

The CPSC and City must listen to the demands of the community along with Sunrise Movement KC as set forth by A People's Climate Town Hall. Here is the full list of demands bit.ly/pcthdemands

It's time for Kansas City to act on climate. This plan must not leave people behind.

msansari about 2 months ago
Adin about 2 months ago

I'm looking for measurable standards and goals. They may be in the plan, but I saw a lot of vague language, such as "promote" and "engage". Good things, but we must have serious, measurable goals. There must be accountability built into this plan. Our children's future depends on it.

vhager about 2 months ago

Hello, my name is Victoria Hager with the Prairie States Chapter of Elders Climate Action and I am from the 5th District. I am pleased that Kansas City is taking steps to address the complex problems of climate change. However, the need for immediate and drastic action cannot be overstated. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from the People’s Climate Town Hall. Specifically, I really support:
-No new coal leases,
-Electric buses, and more frequent stops
-Fix streets and sidewalks in an equitable manner,
-De-incentivize car-centered living
-Protect housing and jobs of people who may be displaced by green development
-Place the financial burden on those fossil fuel companies and other corporations that have profitted by polluting our environment.
You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

vhager about 2 months ago

Hello, my name is Victoria Hager with Prairie States chapter of Elders Climate Action. I am from the 5th District. I am encouraged that Kansas City has created this climate action plan. However, the urgency of taking immediate action and monitoring compliance with our local plan cannot be overstated. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from the People’s Climate Town Hall. Specifically, I really support:
-No new coal, gas, oil, or taxic plant leases,
-Electric buses, and more frequent buses
-Fix streets and sidewalks equitably
-De-incentivize car-centered living
-Protect people from displacement and job loss due to green development
-Pass costs on to those who have profitted from the polluting, oil companies, et.
You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands
Sincerely,
Victoria Hager

vhager about 2 months ago

I live and work in the Kansas City area and I have some serious concerns about the current draft of the Climate Protection & Resiliency Plan.

The draft plan proposes we embrace “all-electric” and “electrification” without explaining exactly how that will be implemented and without really taking into account the unintended consequences, higher emissions and increased costs for our community and our city’s residents.

Kansas City needs a balance energy policy that includes natural gas to continue to have resilient, reliable and affordable energy now and in the future.

Remember Winter Storm Uri’s rolling electric blackouts last year? Natural gas didn’t fail me – it kept me warm during the February chill.

We all want a healthy, sustainable future but any plan created for the people of Kansas City needs to truly understand and outline a feasible path toward reducing carbon emissions and allowing energy options that meet the needs of all residents -- without placing undue burden on marginalized communities. Plus, a plan created for the people of Kansas City should account for the importance of helping Kansas City remain an attractive and competitive location for businesses, large and small. The current draft of this plan accomplishes none of these goals.

Kansas City residents and business owners – we deserve a balanced energy approach that includes energy options and matches the needs of all people. This includes a diverse energy portfolio.

villan10 about 2 months ago

Lots of folks in the gas industry are trying to act like they are speaking for working class people and small business owners while pushing for fossil gas- but let's be clear that at Sunrise Movement KC's People's Climate Town Hall we had LOTS of working class and small business owners who do not view fossil gas as a solution.

So let's be abundantly clear: there is no future with fossil fuels and that includes fossil gas. The climate crisis is here and getting worse- people concerned about "energy choice" or "black outs" are pushing fossil gas as a working class solution but it is not. It's really simple: help pay for people to transition to electric heating and stoves, to solar panels on their roof. Keep energy local. Regulate Evergy to ensure rates don't go up. Black outs happen because of an overstrained grid- we can produce energy locally and anyone in the gas industry seriously concerned about jobs should be given priority training in the move to renewables. Additionally, we can not overstate the impact of fossil gas on indoor air quality. Gas is not safe for your lungs and has been linked to cause cancer. Continuing this industry is a public health issue.

mgwolfe95 about 2 months ago

Hi! Are folks familiar with the new super-white roofs to make a huge change in keeping structures cooler with much less energy use? All new construction should utilize this concept.

Diane Capps about 2 months ago

While it is important, this isn't a balanced energy policy. Last February 2021 we had a sample of rolling blackouts throughout Kansas City. You're dealing with people's lives and our livelihood with decisions that are selfish. Just because other cities are taking on this model doesn't mean its for this city. Also, Natural Gas isn’t just used for heating anymore. By the way the most common uses of Natural Gas are generating electricity.

TWilliams about 2 months ago

I'm a mom. My kid is a toddler now, but by time he's 10, Kansas City may already be in desperate shape due to natural disasters and unpredictable climate changes. The whole country need to take climate action and KC is uniquely positioned to take that action right now because we've taken the initial measure of declaring a climate emergency. The Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan is our first and maybe only chance to get it right, and the Plan needs to be stronger.

I suggest these improvements:

+ This plan should be more specific and have goals that are measurable and have commiserate deadlines.

+ "Net Zero" isn't enough. We should be zero carbon by 2040.
Clean energy:

+ Evergy should close its Hawthorn coal plant in Indian Mound — and all coal plants — as humanly soon as possible, and the city should enact a plan quickly to do so. We have to shift ratepayer money to clean energy and modernizing households and buildings.

We need to leave gas behind. We need renewable solutions now. Municipal buildings should phase out of natural gas by 2030. The City should not support false, expensive solutions like renewable natural gas.

+ Low income residences should be able to access improvements like rooftop solar, community solar, and better building insulation, and the City should help them.

+ The City should really put resources and care into adopting the bike plan. Walking and biking should be safer and it will keep our air clean as more people will adopt safe, carbon-free ways of getting around.

Katie Hasty about 2 months ago

I support this plan almost without reservation. My only concern would be to further increase the emphasis on reducing Vehicle Miles Traveled relative to the emphasis on transitioning to EVs and so-called green energy. Both of the latter have been shown to have a negligible net impact on the environment -- and even likely a worsened environmental impact if aggressive timelines are followed. Reduced dependence on electricity and fossil fuels, reduced consumption overall, and increased use of reusable materials are all needed in the short and long term to attain a net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. (See https://medium.com/a-balanced-transition/five-reasons-why-electric-cars-will-only-worsen-our-oil-problems-e1308da06b5f for an intro to the latest research on this topic.)

mattstephenskc about 2 months ago

The plan needs specific and actionable targets:

* Close Evergy’s Hawthorn coal plant in Indian Mound neighborhood by 2025 and all remaining coal plants by 2030.

*Ensure ratepayer money is being spent not on more gas infrastructure  but on clean energy and helping modernize households and buildings to help meet demands of the grid. 

*Make sure low income residents can access things like rooftop solar and insulation improvements.  

*Need east-west Max line.

* Phase natural gas out of all municipal buildings by 2030. City should not support false, expensive solutions like renewable natural gas.

*We should be aiming for zero carbon by 2040 not net zero.

*City should adopt the bike plan and put more funding towards making it safer to bike and walk.

Sandra Ryals Alig about 2 months ago

While I understand Climate Change is a focus, we need to find the best solution all around. The proposed ban of fossil fuels would drastically impact homeowners, small businesses, and industrial operations. It appears there hasn't been a true feasibility study of what's being proposed. This would have a dramatic effect on the affordability of housing among other structures. Why would you want to rely solely on Electric? We live in the Midwest and often reach extreme cold temperatures where natural gas plays a crucial role. How many times have you lost power? Natural gas outages are rare if any. I can't help to think of those poor family's in TX where the grid simply wasn't strong enough. Natural gas is affordable, reliable, and abundant. I'm all for improving KC, however lets be rational about our choices. Do not make decisions without doing your homework to understand the impacts!

Momwhocares about 2 months ago

Missouri Grocers Association – Response to KC Climate Plan

As the president of the Missouri Grocers Association, I proudly represent the independent retailers, wholesalers, distributors, brokers, suppliers, vendors, and manufacturers that constitute the grocery industry, and I am concerned about how our members in Kansas City will be impacted by the KC Climate Protection & Resiliency Action Plan if it is implemented as currently drafted.

Our membership is comprised of businesses of all sizes and that come from different industries, which require a variety of resources to meet their needs. The draft climate plan would make electricity the only energy source for our members in Kansas City and would limit options for meeting the energy demands of their businesses.

Currently, natural gas is an important resource for many of our members. It is used to cook meals in their kitchens, heat stores during the winter, and operate machinery at plants. Business owners know what works best, and they often choose natural gas because electricity is three times as expensive for heating and it is more reliable with much less frequent outages.

Grocers and suppliers play an important role in feeding communities and they need to have the ability to access the resources needed to continue doing their job. While finalizing he KC Climate Protection & Resiliency Action Plan, officials must take the consequences of having electricity as the only energy source into consideration and support the ability for the residents and businesses of the city to continue utilizing natural gas.

Dan Shaul
Executive State Director
Missouri Grocers Association

MGA about 2 months ago

"Hello, my name is Hillary and I am a Kansas City, Missouri resident. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from Sunrise Movement KC's People’s Climate Town Hall. Specifically, I support closing Evergy's Hawthorn coal plant and creating community-driven green, renewable energy as well as decarbonizing our homes and buildings quickly without raising rents and displacing our neighbors. You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

hmyles about 2 months ago

I live in the Greater Kansas City area and I have some serious concerns about the current draft of the Climate Protection & Resiliency Plan.

Kansas City needs a balanced energy policy that includes natural gas to continue to have resilient, reliable and affordable energy now and in the future.

We all want a healthy, sustainable future but any plan created for the people of Kansas City needs to truly understand and outline a feasible path toward reducing carbon emissions and allowing energy options that meet the needs of all residents -- without placing undue burden on marginalized communities.

The Facts:
Environment: Natural gas plays an important part in a sustainable energy future. The direct use of natural gas is 91% efficient, compared to electricity at 36% from generation to site. Banning or limiting access to natural gas in the city’s climate plan runs counter to Kansas City’s environmental goals and will result in increased greenhouse gas emissions.
Affordability: Even with recent cost increases due to market conditions, the cost of heating with natural gas is substantially less compared to electric heating. Families using gas equipment and appliances in their homes save more than $1,000 a year on average versus homes using electricity.
Reliability: Natural gas distribution systems operate at very high levels of service reliability. Unplanned annual natural gas service outages affect as few as 1 in 800 natural gas customers per year. By comparison, all electric customers can expect at least one outage event per year.

SMH about 2 months ago

I have read a lot of the comments posted by commenters here and I care about the future of our environment too. But the idea that KC has to be powered by renewable-only electric to preserve the environment is crazy. I thought we lived in a democracy where there is a freedom of choice. I don't want some committee/local government telling me what kind energy I can use. In addition, until recently, I owned an all electric newly built home and my electric bill tripled in usage. I've read that there is a big push for solar, but for the average home owner like me who have to account for every penny spent, I can't afford to install a solar system. Whose to say if this plan passes that the electric rates increase more than they are currently. I want a choice.

Concerned Resident about 2 months ago

I am a resident of the fourth district, in KCMO.

I strongly support the plans for an increase in micro-mobility solutions -- specifically biking and walking. The biking and pedestrian infrastructure will only work if families and young children can use it without worry. If we can't make them feel safe, we are hurting our own efforts. Please focus on making the trails and pathways protected from cars.

I am also very concerned with heat island effects and the ecological cost of concrete. I urge you to increase your goal for the tree canopy to at least 50%, and would ask that you look into ways to replace concrete on city land -- you could replace your parking lots with grass lots, which would be less expensive, more durable, decrease maintenance cost and time, be more ecological sound, help recapture rain water, and help with urban heat capture!

Beth Hartman about 2 months ago

Hi, my name is Kailee, and I am a KCMO resident. I support a Green New Deal, which is why I am making comments on the CPRP. I have already made my comments but I wanted to comment again to make sure the message of climate justice, racial justice, and economic justice is heard.
The CPSC and City must listen to the demands of the community along with Sunrise KC as set forth by the People's Climate Town Hall. Here is the full list of demands bit.ly/pcthdemands
It's time for Kansas City to act on climate. This plan must not leave people behind.

Kailee about 2 months ago

Mobility: I support a greater emphasis on bike lanes and sidewalk upkeep for pedestrians. Make it safer for people to use foot-powered transportation, and more convenient by having MORE of it.

Increase the number of bus routes. There should be an east-west MAX route. Work with JoCo and other neighboring cities to increase options for travel around the entire city. There have been a lot of staffing shortages - some people depend on the bus routes to get to work and school and other important parts of their day! And, some MORE people could opt to depend on them, if they were convenient and dependable.

NRG about 2 months ago
Page last updated: 13 Apr 2022, 12:47 PM