Mobilize

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

This phase involves mobilizing for climate action. We want to hear how residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and community organizations can help activate the plan and accelerate climate action in Kansas City and beyond.


The final Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan has been adopted and is available here!


We reviewed over 700 comments to create the final plan. Thank you for your input and advocacy Kansas City.

Plan appendices and supplemental documentation are currently being updated. The draft versions of these documents can be accessed through the "Important Links" section to the right.


Next Steps For Plan Activation

1) Get the word out about the Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan to your friends and neighbors. If your organization would like a presentation about the CPRP, contact the Office of Environmental Quality at OEQ@kcmo.org.

2) If you are an organization wishing to partner with the City on climate action initiatives or have an idea for a program or project, contact the Office of Environmental Quality at OEQ@kcmo.org.

3) Attend meetings of the Climate Protection Steering Committee and other city boards and commissions. You can sign up here by subscribing to the City Clerk's Office notifications.

This phase involves mobilizing for climate action. We want to hear how residents, neighborhoods, businesses, and community organizations can help activate the plan and accelerate climate action in Kansas City and beyond.


The final Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan has been adopted and is available here!


We reviewed over 700 comments to create the final plan. Thank you for your input and advocacy Kansas City.

Plan appendices and supplemental documentation are currently being updated. The draft versions of these documents can be accessed through the "Important Links" section to the right.


Next Steps For Plan Activation

1) Get the word out about the Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan to your friends and neighbors. If your organization would like a presentation about the CPRP, contact the Office of Environmental Quality at OEQ@kcmo.org.

2) If you are an organization wishing to partner with the City on climate action initiatives or have an idea for a program or project, contact the Office of Environmental Quality at OEQ@kcmo.org.

3) Attend meetings of the Climate Protection Steering Committee and other city boards and commissions. You can sign up here by subscribing to the City Clerk's Office notifications.

Plan Comments

Use this tool if you have a few comments you are okay with sharing publicly

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Be specific with which communities will be benefited by the plan, including houseless people, and Black and brown people Passed.
Protect communities from gentrification (ie. displacement) in housing Passed.
Guaranteed housing for all Passed.
Change goals, currently calculated by mile driven, to emissions produced in order to de-incentivize car-centered living Passed
CPRP should add local control of KCPD to maximize city control of its own budget Passed.
CPRP should add defunding KCPD Passed.
CPRP should include permanently affordable green social housing Passed.
Green development from the CPRP should NOT cause gentrification (i.e people should not displaced by green development) Passed.
Rooftop solar buildout benefits frontline communities first (including renters) Passed.
City should fund retrofits that prioritize frontline communities; retrofits paid for by Evergy and Spire Passed.
More utility disclosures of energy costs Passed.
Include disclosure of ratepayer dollars being used for lobbying by utilities Passed.
Public job training for insulating and retrofitting homes Passed.
Beef up city’s mIcro-transit program for those with disabilities to make more convenient Passed.
Guarantee jobs to anyone that loses one in the transition away from fossil fuels Passed.
No outside jobs, prioritize KC frontline people with 50% of jobs going to Frontline communities (specifically poor and Black and Brown communities), jobs must be union jobs Passed.
Expansion of transit, bike lanes, sidewalks Passed.
Fix streets and sidewalks regardless of whether there is development there or not Passed.
All city electric scooters and bikes should be free Passed.
Make electric transit safe and accessible Passed.
Employ people in beautification projects (artists to create murals), employ people to teach more classes, and employ people to grow their own food) Passed.
Bus workers get better pay (busses are understaffed and not running at full capacity right now because of low pay) Passed.
Buses every 5-10 minutes (not 30 minutes to 1 hour) Passed.
Electric buses Passed.
CPRP should include an East/West Max bus line and an East/West street car - no one’s rent should be raised where these projects are built Passed.
Everyone gets a union, without interference from employers Passed.
Wages adjusted for inflation Passed.
CPRP must engage workers in every step of the implementation of the plan Passed.
Close Hawthorn coal plant ASAP (not 2025) Passed
Replace with renewable energy produced in KC Passed.
No new coal, gas, oil, or toxic plants or leases Passed.
Community choice energy, meaning that electricity is provided by a community controlled energy provider through publicly owned renewable energy Passed.
Electrify everything as quickly as possible Passed
Tax polluters and put public dollars behind these programs Passed.
No incentives for development without rooftop solar Passed.

Nota_Tree 5 months ago

Natural gas production causes release of massive amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Our prosperity in the Midwest depends on a healthy agriculture industry, and we should not remain stuck in fossil fuel consumption habits that destabilize the climate and weather reliability our farmers need. Therefore we need a plan for ratcheting down our consumption of natural gas and coal as our developing technology enables us to do so. Heating homes with gas makes one vulnerable to price volatility, and the unreliable life span of fracked wells makes for more volatility. On the other hand, the price of electricity will grow more and more stable as wind and solar generation provides an increasing share of electricity. Developing large battery technology enables more and more reliance on wind and solar electricity generation. Heat pump water heaters have become easier to install Electrical Induction cooktops now are responsive to chefs’ needs so we don’t need the indoor pollution from natural gas. The natural gas distribution system is too leaky and there should be less gas transmission, not more. Let’s not let our energy plan be bent to the benefit of those who are invested in an energy source that is not earth friendly– natural gas!

Rev Scott Myers 5 months ago

The Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan is an important start for Kansas City to address our current climate emergency. Action needs to be taken to close the Hawthorne coal plant as soon as possible and move toward having a publicly owned renewable energy provider for Kansas City. Give incentives and assistance especially in low income communities to weatherize homes and move toward renewal energy. Adopt the International code council 2021 standards for energy efficiency in all new construction.
Provide job training in clean energy careers especially in communities of color. Continue to expand mass transit throughout the city. Have a climate goal of carbon neutral by 2030.
Make the Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan a top priority for funding and implementation now.

PamS 5 months ago

My name is Sarah, and I am a resident of the 4th District. I am also a member of the Volker Neighborhood association, as well as an owner of multiple properties in Kansas City. I appreciate the effort and intention put into this plan, but I hold various concerns both about some of its components and objectives.

I’m a building owner and landlord who is concerned about climate and gentrification issues. Even though we have seen fair market rental values skyrocket, my husband and I rent many of our properties at or below fair market value in order to make them viable and affordable living options for renters who continue to be squeezed out.

Additionally, as both a resident and landlord, I would like to see more robust support for building electrification. While it is something that we are considering for our own home, building electrification for our rental properties is not incentivized in a way that makes it an attractive option for investment properties. Building electrification is one of the most important decarbonization strategies. Your plan mentions on page 4 that heating, cooling, and powering our homes and buildings is one of the largest contributors to GHG emissions. With over 40% of housing stock in KCMO being rental property, it is critical to prioritize this strategy by supporting building electrification, incentivizing property owners and landlords to do so for their tenants as well.

From an equity standpoint, building electrification should also be prioritized if your focus truly aims to center the most under-resourced communities in this plan. Support equitable and inclusive financing options for renters and low-income residents to also electrify and/or invest in energy efficiency upgrades. Gas appliances emit a wide range of air pollutants. In fact, homes with gas stoves have nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations that are 50 percent to over 400 percent higher than in homes with electric stoves. As a result, the air indoors—where people spend nearly 90 percent of their time—is often more polluted than outdoor air. Additional pollutants such as CO, particulate matter, and formaldehyde from gas appliances can all cause negative health effects, often exacerbating respiratory conditions like asthma and allergies. Children living in homes with gas stoves are 42 percent more likely to suffer asthma symptoms than those living in homes with electric stoves. As climate chaos worsens, the need to heat and cool our homes will become even greater, creating an even higher energy burden on overburdened communities while further contributing to GHG emissions. Not to mention, many of these individuals often lack access to affordable medical care and prescription drugs to address health issues that arise from these impacts. (Source: https://rmi.org/eight-benefits-of-building-electrification-for-households-communities-and-climate/#:~:text=Building%20electrification%20will%20bring%20cleaner,states%20meet%20their%20climate%20goals.)

I support including more renewable energy sources in the grid mix and utility-scale renewable energy power purchases while also supporting opportunities for communities to generate their own power (community-based solar, distributed generation) in a way that isn’t punished with grid-access fees or other disincentives by Evergy.

Aging gas infrastructure will require costly upgrades to maintain, which will be passed on to customers, further increasing utility burden, contributing to indoor air pollution, and exponentially increasing GHG emissions, both from usage and leakage in production and distribution. I don’t see anything in the plan about reducing our use of “renewable natural” gas. We should absolutely be focusing on reducing our dependence on gas.

Close the Hawthorne Coal Plant by 2025. There is no way KCMO can say it is committed to equity and environmental justice without making this an absolute priority.

Support KC Tenant’s People’s Housing Trust Fund and other anti-gentrification policies. Their work and the voices of underrepresented and under-resourced residents should be centered in this conversation.

I am also passionate about local food systems and doing everything possible to foster a resilient food system. I support all of the components of the food section, but I want to elevate the need for a city-wide composting program. Food waste contributes to a tremendous amount of solid waste and methane emissions each year - investing in a city-wide composting program would divert up to 40% of our food purchases from the landfill while creating a renewable resource that builds soil health and further supports regenerative agricultural practices.

Incentivize restaurants to reduce plastic, styrofoam, and food waste through food waste recovery and distribution channels, city-wide recycling and composting for restaurants, and a city-wide program providing reusable food storage containers.

Consider a zero emissions rather than a net zero stance. The intense storms happening tonight will only become more and more frequent, as suggested by the most recent IPCC report. I have children. We have future generations to consider. The changes we need require an all hands on deck approach. The time is now.

Thank you for taking public comments, and for your efforts to make our city more resilient while reducing our emissions.

SDF 5 months ago

The Midwest Hearth, Patio, and Barbecue Association urges you to reconsider the phasing out of natural gas in the draft Climate Protection and Resilience Plan. This plan will negatively impact our members' businesses in Kansas City and will not allow them to provide secondary gas heating products many Kansas Citians rely on.

The Midwest Hearth, Patio, and Barbecue Association represents retailers, service companies, distributors, and manufacturers of indoor and outdoor gas heating and cooking appliances. There are over 25 hearth and barbecue businesses in and around the Kansas City area, which employ hundreds of Kansas Citians. This plan would not only affect these businesses and their employees but would have a snowball effect which would eliminate jobs through our supply chains and independent contractors that we work with.

In addition to job losses, many Kansas Citians' would be unable to afford their heating bills as many use natural gas, which is a clean source of energy. Homes using natural gas for heating, cooking and drying clothes saved an average of over $800 per year compared to those using other energy sources. Gas fireplaces are a reliable source of secondary heat and can be crucial for families if/when they lose electricity during a storm and need a backup source of heat.

Banning natural gas would not only negatively impact our members' businesses, their customers, and communities, but it also threatens to take away the right of Kansas Citians to choose the type of appliances for their homes and businesses.

Thank you for your consideration.

EGeil 5 months ago

Here's a slight expansion of a comment I made this afternoon:
Natural gas production causes release of massive amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Our prosperity in the Midwest depends on a healthy agriculture industry, and we should not remain stuck in fossil fuel consumption habits that destabilize the climate and weather reliability our farmers need. Therefore we need a plan for ratcheting down our consumption of natural gas and coal as our developing technology enables us to do so. Heating homes with gas makes one vulnerable to price volatility, and the unreliable life span of fracked wells makes for more volatility. -- https://www.desmog.com/2019/01/10/fracking-shale-oil-wells-drying-faster-predicted-wall-street-journal/ While on the other hand, the price of electricity will grow more and more stable as wind and solar generation provides an increasing share of electricity. Developing large battery technology enables more and more reliance on wind and solar electricity generation. -- https://e360.yale.edu/features/in-boost-for-renewables-grid-scale-battery-storage-is-on-the-rise
Heat pump water heaters have become easier to install. -- https://cleantechnica.com/2021/11/29/120-volt-heat-pump-water-heaters-hit-the-market-make-gas-replacements-even-easier/
Electrical Induction cooktops now are responsive to chefs’ needs , -- https://www.ahs.com/home-matters/tech/all-about-induction-cooktops/
so we don’t need the indoor pollution from natural gas. -- https://www.npr.org/2021/10/07/1015460605/gas-stove-emissions-climate-change-health-effects
The natural gas distribution system is too leaky , and there should be less gas transmission, not more. -- https://thegasindex.org/where-leaks-occur/
Let’s not let our climate protection plan be bent to the benefit of those who are invested in the current form of ‘buggy whips’ – natural gas!

JTenvir 5 months ago

On pg. 1, the Draft CP&RP asserts that, "Many of these changes are irreversible for centuries, especially changes in the ocean, ice sheets and global sea level." My understanding is that such changes will be irreversible far longer into the future than a matter of centuries, and the more radically we disrupt all these systems, the longer they will be disruped.

The thing that strikes me most about the Draft CP&RP is how little it addresses the contribution Kansas City's sprawl has made to Vehicle Miles Traveled and, consequently, transportation greenhouse gas emissions. We need a metro-wide agreement to curb sprawl. I don't have any illusions that this will be easy - not only KCMO but multiple municipalities on both sides of the state line have seen such development as good for their tax bases (whether or not this pencils out in reality) - but it is essential. It won't work to only have KCMO withdraw subsidies for development in the Northland and out south because that will just squeeze it elsewhere.

The explanation of the Urban Heat Island effect on page 59 is correct but incomplete, omitting the role that waste heat from vehicles, air conditioners, factories and other machinery play in making the city hotter.

While the Draft CP&RP does a good job of outlining a strategy to fully electrify existing buildings, it says nothing about the need to stop building more methane gas infrastructure. Given the fact that methane gas is 86 times as potent as CO2 at trapping heat in the atmosphere over a 20-year time-frame and distribution systems are inherently leaky, we need to require new residential and commercial buildings to be fully electrified whenever feasible. It makes no sense to continue to invest in new infrastructure reliant on an energy source that we need to phase out ASAP. This will have the cobenefit of dramatically improving indoor air quality as methane gas combustion for home heating, water heaters and stoves is a major source of pollution. Indeed, gas stoves emit pollutants even when they're not being used.

JohnKurmann 5 months ago

I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from the People’s Climate Town Hall. Specifically, I really support no incentives for development without solar. You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

marisa 5 months ago

This plan is a good starting point to help bring Kansas City and it's residents better access to renewable and sustainable energy. I'm in full support of the city taking steps not only to increase sustainability, but to support job development and champion equitable access to the benefits of renewable and sustainable energy. My hope is that as this plan is implemented it doesn't leave behind the most vulnerable residents in the city. The goals geared towards increasing neighborhood access to solar energy, local food access, better walking/biking paths, and improving the tree canopy are promising beginnings to repairing the damage that has been done to the poorer neighborhoods of the city through systematic racism, and policy which did not protect the vulnerable while giving many incentives to people who don't need it. While these are good starting points I would like to see some of the solar programs geared specifically towards low-income residents and homeowners who are living paycheck to paycheck to directly impact their utility cost. It will take time to restore tree canopy, capture carbon, and reduce the heat islands in low-income neighborhoods, so how is the city going to help them access the monetary benefits of sustainable energy?

Alex C 5 months ago

It's great to see a comprehensive plan to help Kansas City modernize and improve itself in regards to climate change and greenhouse emissions. While I'm sure there will be setbacks along the way, there is no reason to not aim high in this regard. No one will look back and regret making a better world for our future! It's commendable that this plan addresses Kansas City's socioeconomic problems and will attempt to improve it's citizen's lives across all levels.

Casey 5 months ago

Hello, I'm Cameron Summers and I'm from the 6th District. I’m a supporter of the Green New Deal, and that’s why I believe this plan must adopt the demands from the People’s Climate Town Hall.  Specifically, I really support measures to reduce gentrification, greater east-west public transportation infrastructure, and the fastest possible reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

You can view the rest of the demands at: https://bit.ly/pcthdemands

Cameron Summers 5 months ago

I'm a Kansas City resident, and I'm very concerned about creating a better future for everyone. As such, I'm a supporter of a Green New Deal, which is why I believe this plan should adopt the demands from Sunrise Movement KC's People's Climate Town Hall. I'm especially interested in green public transport, coupled with permanently affordable, green social housing, with a focus on not pricing people out due to green development. The other demands can be seen at bit.ly/pcthdemands, and I think they're all very reasonable -- especially if we want to get to correct our current course.

E Boyles 5 months ago

It's so easy for us humans to postpone and procrastinate, and with that in mind, I believe it's essential that our climate plan include a series of earlier deadlines to ensure that we all take action sooner rather than later.

2040 and 2050 sound awfully far away given the speed with which we are remaking our climate. Many people in the know seem to think we have this decade - another 7.5 years - to overhaul our ciies and our economy. I think KC's climate plan needs to reflect this urgency. by shrinking our time line. 2035 anyone? 2030?

Secondly; methane has emerged as an even more important greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. For a few decades after it is released, It retains something like 80 times more heat than does carbon dioxide .With the clock running down, we need to focus on strategies that will have maximum impact in minimum time - and that means getting methane our of our energy system. KC's climate plan must address the methane problem.

Evergy has everything to gain here. The Kansas City government is Evergy's largest single customer. That gives our city government significant leverage over the company that supplies our electricity. Our city government needs to lean hard on Evergy to create additional incentives to persuade its customers to electrify our buildings and our transportation. Evergy can sell more electricity - a LOT more electricity. It seems to me the company should play a major role in bringing this to pass by offering rebates to customers for making the shift from methane and electricity,.
KU

kuhlenhuth 5 months ago

Hello, I am a resident in the 5th district in KC. I am a supporter of the Green New Deal. I work closely with individuals who are being pushed out of their housing due to gentrification and unhealthy living conditions. I know that this city needs to step up and do something - something radical - addressing the ROOT of the issue, not the symptoms, and quickly. This city could be an example for climate change activism and proactiveness if we adopt the demands from the People's Climate Town Hall. Instead, Kansas City tends to seem behind on many fronts when it comes to taking care of its own people. We NEED to divest from fossil fuels and electrify quickly. NO new coal, gas, oil or toxic plants or leases. We NEED community choice energy, meaning that electricity is provided by a community controlled energy provider through publicly owned renewable energy. I also highly support affordable green social housing - social housing that does not accelerate gentrification and that is truly affordable. We need a plan that has racial justice and housing at its core - how will Black and Brown communities be benefited? What about houseless people? These questions need to absolutely be at the center, not the peripheral of this plan.

Sophie 5 months ago

CleanAirNow got it right when they said that we frontline communities need WAY more representation and transparency with this process! This plan needs to take a true health equity perspective by holding extractive, fossil fuel polluters accountable. All of the elites and business insiders touting gas and goal aren't living with the consequences of living next to pipelines, coal plants, and toxic sites. https://www.docdroid.net/5wF9w3B/cleanairnow-kcmo-climate-protection-resiliency-plan-pdf

Shut Down Hawthorn! 5 months ago

s a Kansas City resident concerned about the health, welfare, and future of all in our city, I am glad that the city is working to adopt a Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan to ensure that our city takes the necessary bold actions to address the climate crisis we face as a city and country and protect the health and welfare of all in our community. Kansas City was right to adopt strong goals in Resolution 200005, including a commitment to eliminating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity use citywide by 2030, and to ensuring both the final Plan and process for shaping it are focused on equity and inclusion. I further applaud the City for recently passing legislation declaring a climate and ecological emergency challenging us to accelerate the Plan’s targets and regularly review the Plan to ensure we meet our goals. As climate experts across the world have repeatedly stressed the need for taking these steps before it is too late, it is essential that Kansas City takes all necessary steps to meet the moment we face together.

Low-income communities and communities of color disproportionately bear the brunt of the impacts of climate change. Therefore, the climate crisis can only be addressed fully when we also address systemic racism, inequity, and injustice. To meet this challenge and adopt a plan that will be truly effective and enable all Kansas Citians to thrive, we must create a plan that will include everyone in the community to make our city healthier, more resilient, and accessible for all.

To meet our goals, I call on the Kansas City to seize this moment by adopting bold climate action goals in the final plan, including the following:

Sustainable Buildings and Energy Supply
Eliminate greenhouse gas emissions citywide from electricity use by 2030.
Make a plan to secure enough renewable energy to help enable Kansas City to be powered citywide by 100% renewable electricity from wind and solar by 2035.
Include community choice aggregation as a potential strategy for securing renewable energy citywide and work with community stakeholders and state partners to make it a reality.
Set targets for increasing the amount of rooftop solar in the Kansas City metro for 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040, and commit to establishing work groups to identify strategies to achieve these goals.
Commit to electrifying all city-owned buildings by 2030.
Commit to citywide building electrification by 2040.
Set targets for increasing the amount of electric heat pumps in the Kansas City metro for 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040, and commit to establishing work groups to identify strategies to achieve these goals.
Commit to adopting the strongest version of the International Energy Efficiency Code (IECC) regularly, beginning with at least the IECC 2021 for all new commercial and residential buildings as part of Kansas City’s Building Code.
Commit to establishing policies that ensure households of all income levels can benefit from more resilient, healthy, quality, and zero-carbon housing while preventing the displacement of communities and residents.
Achieve net-zero carbon for all new buildings and commit to regularly updating the city’s energy code to be in line with best available building and climate science to ensure efficiency, reduce demand for electricity, and reduce demand for natural gas in buildings.
Reduce the embodied carbon footprint of building materials used in local construction by 50%.
Establish policy prioritizing local greenhouse gas reduction and carbon removal projects. Carbon offsets should be considered only as a last resort, should be derived only from local projects, and should be given a low equity score.
Invest in community renewable projects that deliver clean, affordable electricity to residents.
Work with city staff and partners to increase the number of affordable housing units to ensure we can house all Kansas Citians in healthy homes.
Work with community and regional partners to establish timelines for utilities to transition to renewable energy and retire fossil fuel power infrastructure in line with Kansas City’s and the region’s goals.
Commit to immediately calling on Evergy, Inc. to retire the Hawthorn Coal Plant, located in Kansas City and advocate for and work with the utility to ensure the coal plant is retired by 2025.
Secure funding streams for projects aimed at enhancing energy efficiency and renewable energy supply.
Make a plan to become carbon negative by 2050.
CPRP should include a citywide energy reduction goal, municipal energy reduction goal, citywide energy efficiency ordinance, citywide water conservation goal, citywide water conservation ordinance, related incentives and/or financing assistance.

Transportation and Land Use
80% of new non-residential development is located within the city’s activity centers and corridors.
Establish a plan to ensure new housing in Kansas City is located close to activity centers and corridors.
Set mode share targets to increase the number of trips made by using public transit, biking, walking, carpooling, or avoided altogether by working from home.
Invest in communities to ensure the Bike Plan is equitably implemented.
Expand opportunities for use of city-provided bicycles and ebikes.

Transportation Electrification
Support, in future city planning and budget processes, transitioning to a 100% electric vehicle bus fleet, and expanding public transit routes to ensure all communities are connected to public transit.
Adopt a zero-emissions fleet procurement policy and set a target for transitioning all city fleet vehicles, including light, medium, and heavy-duty to EVs by 2035.
Continue to ensure all public transportation is free and increase availability of transit in areas where it is currently not running frequently enough to meet community needs.
Direct staff to work with community members, stakeholders, and regional partners to maximize vehicle miles traveled using electric personal and public transportation, active transportation, and electric vehicle ownership that is culturally, geographically, and economically diverse.
Make a plan to equitably distribute charging stations to accommodate vehicle miles traveled in the city.

Food and Product Consumption
Ensure all Kansas Citians can access a food system that is community-driven, addresses food insecurity, prioritizes regenerative agriculture, supports dietary and health agency, promotes plant-based foods, and minimizes food waste.
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from institutional, commercial, and government purchasing by at least 50%.
Set a target for a zerowaste goal and aggressively pursue waste reduction, organics composting, and recycling to achieve it.

Natural Systems
Achieve at least 50% citywide tree canopy cover by planting native trees, focusing on increasing canopy cover equitably.
Identify land within the city that can be used as additional carbon sinks, including urban forest, community gardens, native pollinator and rain gardens, and additional greenspace, focusing on building resilience, reducing heat island, and maximizing benefits in disproportionately-burdened areas.
Include all City-owned lands under a management plan that results in neutral or negative carbon emissions and maximizes community benefits.

Implementation and Monitoring
Ensure that the Plan is updated regularly and that communities are engaged in every step of the process for development, implementation, and periodic evaluation of the Plan.
Designate an implementation coordinator in city government for the plan accountable to the City Manager, Mayor, and/or Council to help implement the plan, working with departments and offices across city government.
Include a detailed timeline with a system to prioritize implementation of each strategy, as well as a cost analysis for each strategy.
Commit to publishing Plan implementation progress reports annually, a GHG inventory at least every 3 years, and a plan update at least every 5 years.
Create working groups or citizen advisory boards within or in addition to the Climate Protection Plan Steering Committee to ensure direct participation and engagement of plan implementation by the public.
Incorporate the goals of this plan across all city policy and departments, including the comprehensive plan.
Ensure any major decisions that relate to the Plan are well-advertised to the public and that ample time and notice is given to enable the community to participate.
Include the City’s climate goals in its annual legislative priorities and participate in state regulatory processes that impact the City’s abilities to meet its goals, including calling on utilities to retire fossil fuel power plants before 2035.

Equity and Jobs
Prioritize low-income communities of color to be the first to benefit from CPRP strategies, such as sustainable transportation infrastructure, increase renewable energy, and affordable infill housing.
Include a green jobs section that provides data quantifying both job quality and demographic and geographic distribution of workers.
Commit to leveraging existing skilled training and apprenticeship infrastructure to create and sustain middle-class career ladders.
Recognize and support existing community-led organizations, businesses, and programs that can help achieve the goals in Kansas City’s Plan while building a green and just economy and culture.
Create green jobs and entrepreneurship opportunities that advance the goals of this plan, expand economic opportunity and inclusion, and build agency and decision-making power in low-income communities and communities of color.
Work with partners to secure educational and funding support for local workforce development, job-training, and economic opportunity for residents.

Thank you for your time and the opportunity to weigh in on this important issue and for your continued commitment to serving all Kansas Citians.

Respectfully Submitted,
Sunny Hamrick

Sunny 5 months ago

Hello. Here is a concern about expanding natural gas, this is a problem for all. We need to help people in fossil fuel industries get new careers and technical jobs. We need all people to support move to renewables and decrease use of all fossil fuels. Furthermore, gas leaks in urban areas are dangerous and wasteful.

Natural gas production causes release of massive amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Our prosperity in the Midwest depends on a healthy agriculture industry, and we should not remain stuck in fossil fuel consumption habits that destabilize the climate and weather reliability our farmers need. Therefore we need a plan for ratcheting down our consumption of natural gas and coal as our developing technology enables us to do so. Heating homes with gas makes one vulnerable to price volatility, and the unreliable life span of fracked wells makes for more volatility.[1] While on the other hand, the price of electricity will grow more and more stable as wind and solar generation provides an increasing share of electricity. Developing large battery technology enables more and more reliance on wind and solar electricity generation.[2] Heat pump water heaters have become easier to install.[3] Electrical Induction cooktops now are responsive to chefs’ needs[4], so we don’t need the indoor pollution from natural gas.[5] The natural gas distribution system is too leaky[6], and there should be less gas transmission, not more. Let’s not let our energy plan be bent to the benefit of those who are invested in the current form of ‘buggy whips’ – natural gas!


[1] https://www.desmog.com/2019/01/10/fracking-shale-oil-wells-drying-faster-predicted-wall-street-journal/

[2] https://e360.yale.edu/features/in-boost-for-renewables-grid-scale-battery-storage-is-on-the-rise

[3] https://cleantechnica.com/2021/11/29/120-volt-heat-pump-water-heaters-hit-the-market-make-gas-replacements-even-easier/

[4] https://www.ahs.com/home-matters/tech/all-about-induction-cooktops/

[5] https://www.npr.org/2021/10/07/1015460605/gas-stove-emissions-climate-change-health-effects

[6] https://thegasindex.org/where-leaks-occur/

Jane Kloeckner 5 months ago

Kansas City should be a national leader in going to 100% renewable energy, investing in clean energy infrastructure (including electric transportation, pedestrian, and bike lines) and being 100% renewable for all energy consumption by 2025.

We should incentivize homes and businesses to install solar and energy efficiency improvements.

Mitch6632 5 months ago

I fully support the group devising the plan for the Smart City we desperately need. It will make an incredible impact on air, water, and all aspects of a sustainable beautiful environment.

Marnie 5 months ago

As a Kansas City resident concerned about the health, welfare, and future of all in our city, I am glad that the city is working to adopt a Climate Protection and Resiliency Plan to ensure that our city takes the necessary bold actions to address the climate crisis we face as a city and country and protect the health and welfare of all in our community. Kansas City was right to adopt strong goals in Resolution 200005, including a commitment to eliminating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity use citywide by 2030, and to ensuring both the final Plan and process for shaping it are focused on equity and inclusion. I further applaud the City for recently passing legislation declaring a climate and ecological emergency challenging us to accelerate the Plan’s targets and regularly review the Plan to ensure we meet our goals. As climate experts across the world have repeatedly stressed the need for taking these steps before it is too late, it is essential that Kansas City takes all necessary steps to meet the moment we face together.

Low-income communities and communities of color disproportionately bear the brunt of the impacts of climate change. Therefore, the climate crisis can only be addressed fully when we also address systemic racism, inequity, and injustice. To meet this challenge and adopt a plan that will be truly effective and enable all Kansas Citians to thrive, we must create a plan that will include everyone in the community to make our city healthier, more resilient, and accessible for all.

To meet our goals, I call on the Kansas City to seize this moment by adopting bold climate action goals in the final plan, including the following:

Sustainable Buildings and Energy Supply
● Eliminate greenhouse gas emissions citywide from electricity use by 2030.
● Make a plan to secure enough renewable energy to help enable Kansas City to be powered citywide by 100% renewable electricity from wind and solar by 2035.
● Include community choice aggregation as a potential strategy for securing renewable energy citywide and work with community stakeholders and state partners to make it a reality.
● Set targets for increasing the amount of rooftop solar in the Kansas City metro for 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040, and commit to establishing work groups to identify strategies to achieve these goals.
● Commit to electrifying all city-owned buildings by 2030.
● Commit to citywide building electrification by 2040.
● Set targets for increasing the amount of electric heat pumps in the Kansas City metro for 2025, 2030, 2035, and 2040, and commit to establishing work groups to identify strategies to achieve these goals.
● Commit to adopting the strongest version of the International Energy Efficiency Code (IECC) regularly, beginning with at least the IECC 2021 for all new commercial and residential buildings as part of Kansas City’s Building Code.
● Commit to establishing policies that ensure households of all income levels can benefit from more resilient, healthy, quality, and zero-carbon housing while preventing the displacement of communities and residents.
● Achieve net-zero carbon for all new buildings and commit to regularly updating the city’s energy code to be in line with best available building and climate science to ensure efficiency, reduce demand for electricity, and reduce demand for natural gas in buildings.
● Reduce the embodied carbon footprint of building materials used in local construction by 50%.
● Establish policy prioritizing local greenhouse gas reduction and carbon removal projects. Carbon offsets should be considered only as a last resort, should be derived only from local projects, and should be given a low equity score.
● Invest in community renewable projects that deliver clean, affordable electricity to residents.
● Work with city staff and partners to increase the number of affordable housing units to ensure we can house all Kansas Citians in healthy homes.
● Work with community and regional partners to establish timelines for utilities to transition to renewable energy and retire fossil fuel power infrastructure in line with Kansas City’s and the region’s goals.
● Commit to immediately calling on Evergy, Inc. to retire the Hawthorn Coal Plant, located in Kansas City and advocate for and work with the utility to ensure the coal plant is retired by 2025.
● Secure funding streams for projects aimed at enhancing energy efficiency and renewable energy supply.
● Make a plan to become carbon negative by 2050.
● CPRP should include a citywide energy reduction goal, municipal energy reduction goal, citywide energy efficiency ordinance, citywide water conservation goal, citywide water conservation ordinance, related incentives and/or financing assistance.

Transportation and Land Use
● 80% of new non-residential development is located within the city’s activity centers and corridors.
● Establish a plan to ensure new housing in Kansas City is located close to activity centers and corridors.
● Set mode share targets to increase the number of trips made by using public transit, biking, walking, carpooling, or avoided altogether by working from home.
● Invest in communities to ensure the Bike Plan is equitably implemented.
● Expand opportunities for use of city-provided bicycles and ebikes.

Transportation Electrification
● Support, in future city planning and budget processes, transitioning to a 100% electric vehicle bus fleet, and expanding public transit routes to ensure all communities are connected to public transit.
● Adopt a zero-emissions fleet procurement policy and set a target for transitioning all city fleet vehicles, including light, medium, and heavy-duty to EVs by 2035.
● Continue to ensure all public transportation is free and increase availability of transit in areas where it is currently not running frequently enough to meet community needs.
● Direct staff to work with community members, stakeholders, and regional partners to maximize vehicle miles traveled using electric personal and public transportation, active transportation, and electric vehicle ownership that is culturally, geographically, and economically diverse.
● Make a plan to equitably distribute charging stations to accommodate vehicle miles traveled in the city.

Food and Product Consumption
● Ensure all Kansas Citians can access a food system that is community-driven, addresses food insecurity, prioritizes regenerative agriculture, supports dietary and health agency, promotes plant-based foods, and minimizes food waste.
● Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from institutional, commercial, and government purchasing by at least 50%.
● Set a target for a zerowaste goal and aggressively pursue waste reduction, organics composting, and recycling to achieve it.

Natural Systems
● Achieve at least 50% citywide tree canopy cover by planting native trees, focusing on increasing canopy cover equitably.
● Identify land within the city that can be used as additional carbon sinks, including urban forest, community gardens, native pollinator and rain gardens, and additional greenspace, focusing on building resilience, reducing heat island, and maximizing benefits in disproportionately-burdened areas.
● Include all City-owned lands under a management plan that results in neutral or negative carbon emissions and maximizes community benefits.

Implementation and Monitoring
● Ensure that the Plan is updated regularly and that communities are engaged in every step of the process for development, implementation, and periodic evaluation of the Plan.
● Designate an implementation coordinator in city government for the plan accountable to the City Manager, Mayor, and/or Council to help implement the plan, working with departments and offices across city government.
● Include a detailed timeline with a system to prioritize implementation of each strategy, as well as a cost analysis for each strategy.
● Commit to publishing Plan implementation progress reports annually, a GHG inventory at least every 3 years, and a plan update at least every 5 years.
● Create working groups or citizen advisory boards within or in addition to the Climate Protection Plan Steering Committee to ensure direct participation and engagement of plan implementation by the public.
● Incorporate the goals of this plan across all city policy and departments, including the comprehensive plan.
● Ensure any major decisions that relate to the Plan are well-advertised to the public and that ample time and notice is given to enable the community to participate.
● Include the City’s climate goals in its annual legislative priorities and participate in state regulatory processes that impact the City’s abilities to meet its goals, including calling on utilities to retire fossil fuel power plants before 2035.

Equity and Jobs
● Prioritize low-income communities of color to be the first to benefit from CPRP strategies, such as sustainable transportation infrastructure, increase renewable energy, and affordable infill housing.
● Include a green jobs section that provides data quantifying both job quality and demographic and geographic distribution of workers.
● Commit to leveraging existing skilled training and apprenticeship infrastructure to create and sustain middle-class career ladders.
● Recognize and support existing community-led organizations, businesses, and programs that can help achieve the goals in Kansas City’s Plan while building a green and just economy and culture.
● Create green jobs and entrepreneurship opportunities that advance the goals of this plan, expand economic opportunity and inclusion, and build agency and decision-making power in low-income communities and communities of color.
● Work with partners to secure educational and funding support for local workforce development, job-training, and economic opportunity for residents.

Thank you for your time and the opportunity to weigh in on this important issue and for your continued commitment to serving all Kansas Citians.

Petition signed by 116 residents, submitted by Sierra Club Missouri Chapter 5 months ago
Page last updated: 19 Sep 2022, 11:28 AM